Archive | Food

United Nations agency provides US$33.8 million to boost agriculture sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo

United Nations agency provides US$33.8 million to boost agriculture sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Posted on 01 February 2016 by admin

mapRome, 28 January 2016 – The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) signed an agreement today to finance the North Kivu Agriculture Sector Support project (PASA-NK). Targeting poor farmers and women-headed households, the project aims at raising incomes while boosting the country’s food security.

The total cost of the project is estimated at just under US$53 million. The funding is comprised of a $16.9 million IFAD loan and an additional $16.9 million IFAD grant. The government of DRC will contribute nearly $6 million while beneficiaries will provide an additional $3.5 million. In addition, the Government of DRC is seeking cofinancing of $9.7 million from other donors.

The agreement was signed in Rome by Henri Yav Mulang, Minister for Finance of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and by Kanayo F. Nwanze, President of IFAD.

During the IFAD President’s official visit to the country last year, the project approval and implementation were discussed with government officials. “Considering the amount of rainfall and arable land, the country’s agricultural sector has considerable potential to expand and flourish if the right investments and commitments are made,” Nwanze said.

Although the primary goal of the new project is to improve food security in the DRC, it will also increase incomes of participating smallholder farmers living in the territories of Beni, Lubero, Rutshuru, Nyiragongo and Masisi in the province of North Kivu.

Smallholder farmers targeted by the project are those who typically cultivate less than one hectare, own less than five head of livestock, own rudimentary transportation and are widowed or women heads of households.

Project activities will focus on building the capacity of farmers, farmer’s organizations and provincial agricultural services involved in maize, rice, potato and Arabica coffee value chains. It will ensure that the agricultural services farmers receive from producers’ organizations are adequate and meet their needs. Furthermore, the project will improve smallholder farmers’ access to agricultural inputs, such as fertilizers and certified seeds, and their access to markets. It will assist farmers’ organizations in building storage facilities and warehouses to assist farmers in selling their products at a higher price.

Project activities, implemented by the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, are expected to benefit some 28,400 rural households in the province.

Since 1980, IFAD has invested a total of $183.4 million in eight programs and projects in the DRC, generating a total investment of $326.2 million which has benefited 504,400 households.

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A Study on Somali/East African Foods in King County!

A Study on Somali/East African Foods in King County!

Posted on 10 January 2015 by admin

 

Four students from the University of Washington worked with King County Department of Natural Resources to conduct a study about food. Continue Reading

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Tammy Morales

Building Local Business Ownership to Serve Our Communities

Posted on 18 December 2014 by admin

Tammy Morales

By Tammy Morales

When Shakir Mohamed, owner of West Seattle Halal Market lost his ability to sell WIC items to his customers he lost $120,000 in sales.  Other stores throughout Seattle and south King County are experiencing similar problems as they lose authorization to sell infant formula, bread, milk, and other food items to their low-income customers. These businesses are struggling to stay open because of rules set out by the Washington Department of Health that make it very difficult for small grocery retailers to become authorized WIC and food stamp stores. The rules have little to do with increasing access to WIC food for low-income women. Instead, they are meant to encourage shopping at larger stores where more food items are available. The trouble is that for many immigrant shoppers, they prefer stores that carry familiar items, where someone speaks their language, and where they can say hello to a friend. The rules meant to make shopping easier are, in fact, hurting small businesses and disregarding the preferences of many immigrant communities.

We can, and should, do more to help small immigrant owned businesses in Seattle be successful.  By dedicating more of our resources to supporting local business, we can build a more vibrant local economy and build our community assets. It’s time to focus public resources on encouraging community-controlled development. It’s time to move away from business as usual. Rather than using our local resources to attract outside investment, or assume efficiency and size are the only measures of economic success, we should  find strategies that build our local assets and generate community-ownership. In a community as diverse as ours, we must ensure that business services and training programs are staffed by people who speak different languages and who can help immigrants navigate the license and permit structures of local government.

Studies show that buying from locally owned businesses, rather than national chains, keeps more money  circulating in our local economy. Local businesses tend to buy from other local businesses and service providers. They employ more local people. And more of their profits stay here in our community.

There are many things we can do to change the dynamic of development that gets ahead of the community and leaves people with few options. We need to experiment with new ideas that can address the unequal distribution of wealth in our city. New policy ideas and action can stabilize our communities and stem the displacement happening in Seattle.

As plans develop for investment in the south end, we should consider ways to ensure that local investment creates  community benefit. We need to use our community assets to increase community ownership. A thoughtful, comprehensive strategy will build apprenticeship and technical training programs and grow our local businesses. Improving the connection between these programs can offer strong career ladders  for our community so that everyone gets a chance to make a livable wage for an honest day’s work.

A food innovation center in the Rainier Beach area is one idea that would increase community ownership. I’ve partnered with other specialists to explore the proposal. The center could include food-processing facilities, a food hub to collect and distribute locally-grown produce, or a shared-use commercial kitchen that entrepreneurs can rent to produce products for wholesale or retail markets. A successful food innovation center would create a business cluster environment that spurs local and regional development for small and mid-size food businesses here in South Seattle. It could improve economic self-sufficiency while improving access to fresh, local food. South Seattle communities have a clear interest in developing industry around healthy food. With so many deep cultural and culinary assets to contribute, the time is right to connect those assets to opportunity.

Small business owners like Shakir should be able to count on their local government to provide clear rules about how to get licensed and permitted. He should not be losing sales because of an agency preference for dealing with large stores, many of which are headquartered outside the area. Similarly, our immigrant communities should be able to shop where they choose to get the products they need.   Local businesses often hire people with a better understanding of the products they are selling and take more time to get to know customers. Supporting these businesses not only improves access to healthy food, it also builds ownership in the community and that’s a benefit that serves all of us.

Tammy Morales is a community development professional with a history of engaging neighborhoods in south Seattle and King County around affordable housing, small business development, and healthy food. She is a founding partner at Urban Food Link and a candidate for Seattle City Council, District 2.

 

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soy

Soy Goes Global Inside New Nutritious, Delicious Foods

Posted on 01 April 2014 by admin

soy

St. Louis, Mo. (March 28, 2014) Guatemalan food company Alimentos Sociedad Anonima (Alimentos SA) launched three soy-based Amelia cream soups in March. Ugandan food maker SESACO Ltd. has introduced SoySip, a just-add-hot-water beverage that comes with packets of ginger and sugar. As the United States recognizes April as Soyfoods month, the American Soybean Association’s (ASA) World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) salutes its partners in developing countries for their 2013-2014 introductions of exciting new African and Hispanic foods made with soy protein ingredients.

“We are seeing a bumper crop of new foods containing soy offered by companies and groups that WISHH has assisted through training, product samples and more,” said WISHH Chairman David Iverson, a South Dakota soybean grower. “The U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Agency for International Development (USAID) and soybean checkoff funds are assisting WISHH and its partners to help meet the enormous need for protein in nutritious foods that are also affordable and available for developing country diets.”

Thanks to USDA Foreign Agricultural Service support, WISHH’s many spring 2014 activities include hosting educational conferences in Kenya and Ghana. At these programs, African and U.S. food industry as well as government participants explore opportunities in school feeding and retail programs to offer healthier foods.

WISHH’s USAID-supported work in Liberia is also an example of how production of new soy-based foods creates jobs, including for women, and makes much-needed protein available to local diets. Under the USAID-HANDS program, WISHH and Opportunities Industrialization Centers International have built two processing facilities where women manufacture fortified-blended “Super Gari” cereal made with local cassava. Adding U.S. defatted soy flour helps fill the protein gap that was in the traditional gari.

Click here to see SoySip, Amelia Cream soups and other examples of the new products that WISHH’s partners have introduced in the last year.

Interested in trying to make some international soyfoods yourself? Click here for WISHH and the World Soy Foundation’s recipe book produced by the National Soybean Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois.

For more information about Soyfoods Month, click here

U.S. and developing country diets share common ground in that protein is needed for good health. The majority of U.S. consumers (78 percent) agree that protein contributes to a healthy diet and more than half of adults say they want more of it in their diets, reported the NPD Group in a study released in March.

Global protein ingredient market revenues are expected to reach USD 28.90 billion by 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research. Plant proteins—led by soy– accounted for over 56 percent of global volumes in 2013, and are expected to continue dominating the market over the next six years, growing at an estimated compound annual growth rate of 6.3 percent from 2014 to 2020. Soy-based ingredients accounted for more than 70 percent of global volumes in 2013.

WISHH is a trade-development program. Since U.S. soybean farmers founded WISHH in 2000, it has worked in 24 countries to improve diets, as well as encouraged growth of food industries. The WISHH program is managed from ASA’s world headquarters in St. Louis. For more information, visit www.wishh.org.

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SHIIL GROCERY & HALAL MEAT, Tukaan Caafimaad!

SHIIL GROCERY & HALAL MEAT, Tukaan Caafimaad!

Posted on 04 December 2012 by admin

Tukaanka Shiil ee ku yaal mid ka mida waddooyinka ugu caansan magaalada Seattle, Continue Reading

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JUBA RESTAURANT web

JUBA RESTAURANT OO ISKU FUUQSATAY WIXII MAKHAAYAD AHAA EE NAWAAXIGA SEATTLE!

Posted on 04 December 2012 by admin

Haddaad Juba Restaurant timaado goor kasta, albaabka hore waxa aad ku arkeysaa nalka gaduudan ee biligleynaya ee isdaba ordisiinaya farta gaduudan ee ka kooban O…P…E…N…  Makhaaxida oo ilaa imika ah midda ugu quruxda badan makhaayadaha Soomaalida, waxa kaloo ay naxiib u heshay iney ku taal meel istiriijig ah oo dhow dukaamo ganacsi oo waaweyn  sida Jack in the Box iyo Bartell Drugs kuwaasi oo ay la wadaagto barkin baabuur badan qaadi kara. Makhaaxida waxa ay gudaha ku leedahay fadhi si fiican loo habeeyey oo markiiba qaadi kara ilaa 60 qof oo midba midka kale ciriiri ku heynin. Raashinka oo u badan Soomaali, haddana waxa ku jira kitaabka raashinka  kuwa waddamada dariska la ah Somalia sida Itoobiya iyo Kenya.

Mar kasta ood imaneyso ku soo talo gal inaad heleyso nasiino wacan, daawasho wararkii ugu dambeeyey ood ka daawaneyso telefishin dhawaq wanaagsan, iyo jawi leh muuqaal indhaha ku raaxeystaan. Cunto macaanida waa mid aan su’aal ka taagneyn iyadoo ay ku faro yareysteen kookeyaal cunto karinta buugaagta ka soo bartay isla markaana yaqaan sida leysugu dheelli tiro dhadhanka cuntada iyo dhowrista nafaqada cuntada. Imika oon quraacdan hortiina ka muuqata aan ka cunayo waxa ay indhaheygu daawanayaan buuraha iyo dhirta quruxda ee Seattle. Muraayadaha dariishadaha u ah waa kuwo aad looga shaqeeyo nadaafaddooda  kuwaasi oo si sax ah aad uga dhex arki shimbiraha dhirta ku hareersan makhaayadda iskula ciyaaraya.  Isku soo koob, makhaayaddu waa goob kulameed, meel baahidaada haqab tiri karta, iyo deegaan naftu ku raaxeysato.

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food

Food Waste Fun

Posted on 10 November 2012 by admin

The month of October can be puzzling for folks with families learning to garden.With the weather starting to turn cold, wet and grey again, long periods of time outside seem less enticing.  Visually, the vegetable garden appears to have less going on. However, October is a great time to begin composting your kitchen waste!

There are many methods and devices that you can employ to compost your food waste at home. Popular methods of composting are digestion, burial or tossing your scraps in your curbside collection bin,but for the gardening family, none offers more fun and excitement than a worm bin.

Unlike other food waste composting methods, worm bins allow decomposition to happen above ground.  All the biological processes and fauna of composting can be easily observed in a worm binand the vermicompost that a worm bin produces is practically ambrosia for houseplants or seeds in need of a starting medium.

One challenge many families face is ensuring that their worm bin will be able to accommodate all the food waste they generate. This is a great educational opportunity for a mini “waste audit.”

  • Collect all organic scraps that your family generates and separate it from the rest of the waste for one week.
  • Place them into a few quart-sized yogurt containers with lids in the refrigerator marked with a big “X”
  • Weigh out the collected scraps.

The golden rule for worm bin processing is one pound of food waste per one square foot of container per one week. So, if your family generates 12 pounds of food waste in a week, you’ll need a bin that has a floor plan of 12 square feet.

There are worm bins available on the market and plans available online.To download plans for wooden or plastic worm bins, visit the composting information section on the Seattle Tilth website at http://seattletilth.org/learn/resources-1/compost/compost. Look for the Food Waste Bin heading for Worm Bin Plans (wooden bin) or Off-The-Shelf Worm Bin Plans (Rubbermaid bins converted to  a worm bin). A popular commercial worm bin, ‘The Worm Factory’, is available online at www.compostbins.com. These bins are good for indoor use but also have a smaller footprint than ones you build and will not be able to process as many food scraps as a larger wooden worm bin. You can sometimes find ‘The Worm Factory’ available at local stores that specialize in natural gardening supplies.

You can construct multiple bins to meet your needs or put some of your food scraps in your worm bin and the rest in your curbside collection bin. Both approaches are good for the environment.  And of course, be on the lookout for classes and other resources about composting your food waste and ways to use the finished product on the Seattle Tilth website (www.seattletilth.org)

For personalized questions, call the Garden Hotline at 206-633-0224.Translation services are available. Or visit our web site for composting brochures: www.gardenhotline.org and email a question from there.

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get1

Get Your Gardening On Through the Winter

Posted on 10 November 2012 by admin

Gardening doesn’t have to stop when the temperatures drop and the sun comes out less frequently. There are many activities and plants for your garden that thrive in colder temperatures.

In the vegetable garden you can sow a couple of types of plants during the late autumn to winter transition that will “over winter” or grow slowly in your garden through the chilly and wet winter. Try onions, garlic and shallots for spring or summer harvest perennial herbs for year round clipping, and cover crops to build your soil.

  • Onions, garlic and shallots can be planted October through mid-November. Garlic bulbs can be divided and each clove planted individually while shallots and onions are planted from whole “sets” or bulbs. Each individual planting will develop into a full plant. Garlic is harvested in June or July so make sure that the space you choose to plant them will not be needed for spring planting. Shallots will be ready a little sooner than the garlic and the onions can be pulled as spring green onions or let develop through summer into larger onions harvested when the greens die back.
  • Perennial herbs like lavender, rosemary, thyme, sage and oregano are wonderful additions to the vegetable garden. They provide a year round source of fresh herbs for your meals and when flowering attract many insects that prey on aphids and other problem garden pests. You can find plants at local nurseries.
  • Also consider colorful winter flowering pansies, available at nurseries and even local grocery stores which add bright spots in the garden. The flowers are edible and can be added to green salads for a slightly spicy and colorful touch.
  • Cover crops can be sown from October through mid-November to provide nutrients and organic matter for next year’s garden. Try a cover crop mix of annual rye, vetch and clover for the earliest plantings or, for a later planting try fava beans or rye. In general, fall planted cover crops are either pea family plants or cereal grains like winter wheat, oats or rye. In spring when the ground is ready to work (soil not too wet) turn the cover crops into the soil and let sit for a few weeks before planting. These crops add nutrients, especially nitrogen, and organic matter to your soil and protect the soil through the winter rains.

Overwintering plants have unique soil fertility needs to help them survive the cold and thrive when spring arrives. The goal is balanced growth throughout the fall and early winter. Don’t provide too much nitrogen because it produces fast growth full of water, which makes plants more susceptible to frost damage. In the spring, top-dress the soil around the plants with a high-nitrogen organic fertilizer or composted manure to spur faster spring growth.

In an established garden, the nutrients necessary for fall plant establishment can be supplied by cover crops and compost. Cover crops can be found at local nurseries and through mail order companies like Territorial Seed from Oregon or Peaceful Valley Farm Supply in California.Incorporate well-rotted compost into the entire garden bed. The comparatively warm soil temperatures of fall allow soil bacteria to mineralize the nutrients in the compost, making them available to winter vegetables.

You can protect soil by using mulch. Mulches can reduce soil compaction and erosion, suppress weeds, keep the soil moist, regulate soil temperature and improve soil quality, fertility and texture. Save leaves from your garden, use your home made or store bought compost or spread straw amongst your plants for good winter protection. In your paths you can use wood chips, often available for free from local tree trimmers.

For more information on overwintering vegetables, herbs, flowers and cover crops contact the Garden Hotline at 206-633-0224 with any gardening questions. Translation services are available. Visit our website for links to natural yard care brochures and translated versions of ‘Growing Food in the City’; www.gardenhotline.org. Questions are also accepted from our web site by email.

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goat

ARI, Ha’yad Cusub

Posted on 30 September 2012 by admin

AL HAMDULILLAH. Waxa maalinta Jimcaha ee ku aadaneyd Sept 28 la xareeyey magac hey’ad cusub oo ka howl gali doonta gobolka Washington. Magaca oo laga soo oggolaaday xafiiska Xogayahay Gobolka waxa uu yahay ARI. Magaca hey’addan wuu ka duwan yahay kuwa hadda jira maxaa yeelay waxa uu soo dhoweynayaa qof kasta oo Soomaali ah isku kalsoon, geesi ah, isla markaana horumarka jecel.

Aannu soo dhaweyno ARI (Awareness and Recovery Institute) oo howsheeda ugu weyni tahay waxbarasho iyo samo-fal, gaar ahaan caawinaadda dadka ka soo jeeda Bariga Afrika ee halista ugu jira dhibaatooyin soo wajaha sida da’ yarta iyo qoysaska. Waxan u mahad naqeynaa gabadha looyaradda Soomaaliyeed ee da’da yar Nimco Bulale oo innaga caawintay akhrinta kalmadaha si sharciga aan loogu gafin, sidoo kale Dick Burkhart iyo xaaskiisa  Mona Lee oo waayo arag ku ah dhinaca qorraallada iyo barnaamij u dejinta hey’adaha noocaani ah. Sidoo kale Julie Pham oo magac weyn ku leh gobolka ahna gabar qoraa ah oo shahaadda ugu sarreysa ku heysata cilmiga taariikhda, iyo saaxiibkey Nuradin M Ali oo durba farxad u muujiyey markii uu maqlay magaca qosolka leh marka la soo gaabiyo kaasi oo si wanaagsan looga taxaddaray inuu sidaa ahaado.

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Al Uruba Restaurant oo Weji Cusub u Yeeshay Dhaqankii Makhaayadaha Soomaalida!

Al Uruba Restaurant oo Weji Cusub u Yeeshay Dhaqankii Makhaayadaha Soomaalida!

Posted on 31 August 2012 by admin

Maalinta ciidda waxa magaalada Seattle ku soo kordhay Continue Reading

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